Introducing the 2015 Ordinary Meeting Lectures

The BSPS is pleased to announce the 2015 lecture series associated with our Ordinary Meetings. Lectures occur on Monday Evenings at 5:15pm in the Lakatos Building at LSE room 2.06, and are preceded by a welcome tea at 4:45pm in LSE Common Room G.01.

Jonathan Birch (LSE)

Jonathan Birch

Monday, 12 October 2015

“Kin selection, group selection and cultural change” Find out more…

 

Eran Tal (Cambridge)

Eran Tal

Monday, 23 November 2015

“The Shifting Economies of Measurement Uncertainty” Find out more…

 

Elizabeth Irvine (Cardiff)

Liz Irvine

Monday, 18 January 2016

“Introspection: Decisive Data or Muddled Measurement?” Find out more…

 

Anna Mahtani (LSE)

Anna Mahtani

Monday, 14 March 2016

“Knowledge and the Sure Thing Principle” Find out more…

 

James Ladyman (Bristol)

James Ladyman

Monday, 16 May 2016

“The Hole Argument and Homotopy Type Theory” Find out more…

Reports from the BSPS 2015 Annual Conference in Manchester

It was a successful and memorable annual meeting for the BSPS this year in Manchester. Here is a snapshot of what people were saying about it on Twitter.

BSPS 2015 Conference – Registration Info

Past Event

The BSPS 2015 Conference has now passed.

Registration for the BSPS 2015 annual conference in Manchester was open until 26 June.

  • Standard registration (waged): £155
  • Standard registration (unwaged): £90
  • Conference dinner: £25
  • Wine/beer with conference dinner: £8

The registration fee includes lunch and tea/coffee on both days, plus the drinks reception on Thursday evening.

2014 Popper Prize Winner: Rachael Brown

The decision of the Co-Editors of the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science is that the Sir Karl Popper Prize for 2014 should be awarded to Rachael Brown for her paper ‘What Evolvability Really Is’, Br J Philos Sci (2014) 65 (3): 549-572. Read more

A Process Ontology for Biology | John Dupré

Reflection on the last hundred years of physics might naturally lead one to suppose that the ancient debate as to whether the world was ultimately composed of things or processes had been resolved in favour of the latter. Quantum physics, whatever else it may be, seems to constitute a decisive rejection of the atomism at […]

Journal Rankings | DEVITT’S LGSCD-INDEX & DEVITT’S GSCD-INDEX

Kate Devitt has done some interesting work to improve upon Google Scholar’s journal rankings…

Philosophy of Science for Scientists, and Science for Philosophers of Science | Ellen Clarke

Most professional philosophers of science would, I hope, agree that our discipline shares the object of its investigations with some other academics, i.e. scientists. But how often do we actually talk to them? Till Grüne-Yanoff has published a paper over at the EJPS, making a case for science students to be taught compulsory philosophy of science courses, and setting out some constraints on the optimal design of such courses. He does a great job of identifying some obstacles that advocates of such courses need to overcome.

The brand new blog of the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science

The philosophy of science is entering an exciting era. Its horizons are wider than ever, the topics and areas it covers are even more stimulating, and the interactions with the sciences are both more productive and provocative. As Editors of the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, we have front row seats on all this activity, allowing us to witness an unprecedented period of thrilling research being carried out at the frontiers of biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, as well as the physical and human sciences. The sheer variety and stimulating nature of the topics that we have the pleasure to publish is a testament to the vibrancy of the field.