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November 2015

Eran Tal (Cambridge) “The Shifting Economies of Measurement Uncertainty”

23 November 2015 @ 5:15 am - 6:45 pm
LAK 2.06, The Lakatos Building, London School of Economics
London,WC2A 2AEUnited Kingdom
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January 2016

Elizabeth Irvine (Cardiff) – CANCELLED

18 January 2016 @ 5:15 pm - 6:45 pm
LAK 2.06, The Lakatos Building, London School of Economics
London,WC2A 2AEUnited Kingdom
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Unfortunately, Liz Irvine's talk has been cancelled.

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March 2016

Anna Mahtani (LSE) “Knowledge and the Sure Thing Principle”

14 March 2016 @ 5:15 pm - 6:45 pm
LAK 2.06, The Lakatos Building, London School of Economics
London,WC2A 2AEUnited Kingdom
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May 2016

James Ladyman (Bristol) “The Hole Argument and Homotopy Type Theory”

16 May 2016 @ 5:15 am - 6:45 pm
LAK 2.06, The Lakatos Building, London School of Economics
London,WC2A 2AEUnited Kingdom
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October 2016

Wendy Parker (Durham), “Scientific Modelling and Limits to the Value-Free Ideal”

10 October 2016 @ 5:15 pm - 6:45 pm
LAK 2.06, The Lakatos Building, London School of Economics
London,WC2A 2AEUnited Kingdom
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Abstract. According to the value-free ideal, the internal workings of science, including the evaluation of evidence, should be kept free from the influence of non-epistemic values as much as possible. We identify an underappreciated limit on the extent to which the value-free ideal can be achieved in practice. Our argument – which differs from inductive risk and other recent arguments – is grounded in the fact that, in some fields, scientists use complex scientific models as a replacement for background information…

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November 2016

Luke Fenton-Glynn (UCL), “Probabilistic Actual Causation”

21 November 2016 @ 5:15 pm - 6:45 pm
LAK 2.06, The Lakatos Building, London School of Economics
London,WC2A 2AEUnited Kingdom
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Abstract. Actual (token) causation – the sort of causal relation asserted to hold by claims like the Chicxulub impact caused the Cretaceous-Paleogene exitinction event, Mr. Fairchild’s exposure to asbestos caused him to suffer mesothelioma, and the H7N9 virus outbreak was caused by poultry farmers becoming simultaneously infected by bird and human 'flu strains – is of significance to scientists, historians, and tort and criminal lawyers. It also plays a role in theories of various philosophically important concepts, such as action, decision,…

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January 2017

Marta Halina (Cambridge HPS), “The role of values in animal cognition research”

16 January @ 5:15 pm - 6:45 pm
LAK 2.06, The Lakatos Building, London School of Economics
London,WC2A 2AEUnited Kingdom
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Abstract: The role of non-epistemic values in accepting and rejecting scientific hypotheses has long been recognized. As Rudner (1953) observes, “how sure we need to be before we accept a hypothesis will depend on how serious a mistake would be”. Non-epistemic values play a role whenever the hypothesis under consideration has practical consequences. Despite this, discussions aimed at evaluating scientific evidence often fail to take non-epistemic values into account. This is particularly true in comparative psychology, which is surprising, given…

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March 2017

Karim Thébault (Bristol), “Cosmic Singularity Resolution via Quantum Evolution”

13 March @ 5:15 pm - 6:45 pm
LAK 2.06, The Lakatos Building, London School of Economics
London,WC2A 2AEUnited Kingdom
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Abstract: Classical models of the universe generically feature a big bang singularity. That is, when we consider progressively earlier and earlier times, physical quantities stop behaving in a reasonable way. A particular problem is that physical quantities related to the curvature of spacetime become divergent. A long standing hope is that a theory of quantum gravity would `resolve’ the big bang singularity by providing quantum models of the early universe in which all physical quantities are always finite. Unfortunately, not…

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June 2017

Heather Dyke (LSE), “Experience of Passage in a Static World”

12 June @ 5:15 pm - 6:45 pm
LAK 2.06, The Lakatos Building, London School of Economics
London,WC2A 2AEUnited Kingdom
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Abstract. The view that experience seems to tell us directly that time flows has long been accepted by both A-theorists and B-theorists in the philosophy of time. A-theorists take it as a powerful endorsement of their position, sometimes using it explicitly in an argument for their view, and other times more implicitly, as a kind of non-negotiable, experiential given. B-theorists have tended to accept that we have this experience, and have sought alternative explanations for it, consistent with the B-theory. The…

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October 2017

Parallel Universes: A Philosophy and Physics Panel

23 October @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
Wolfson Theatre, LSE, New Academic Building, 54 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London,WC2A 3LJ
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Speakers Fay Dowker, Professor of Theoretical Physics, Imperial College London Eleanor Knox, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, King’s College London Simon Saunders, Professor of Philosophy of Physics, University of Oxford Chair Jonathan Birch, Fellow, The Forum; Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE Is Schrödinger’s cat alive or dead? This thought experiment was devised to illustrate a fundamental puzzle in quantum mechanics. A radical solution is that the cat is both alive and dead, but in different, parallel…

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Accessibility

The BSPS Ordinary Meetings and Lectures are held on the 2nd floor of the Lakatos Building (LAK) at the London School of Economics, which is an accessible building with stair-free access. See the LSE Accessibility Map for more information about accessibility at the School more generally.